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Grant v. Palmyra Medical Center

United States District Court, M.D. Georgia, Albany Division

September 30, 2014

MILDRED GRANT, Plaintiff,
v.
PALMYRA MEDICAL CENTER, Defendant.

ORDER

W. LOUIS SANDS, District Judge.

Presently pending before the Court is Defendant Palmyra Medical Center's Motion for Summary Judgment. (Doc. 31.) For the following reasons, Defendant's Motion for Summary Judgment is GRANTED.

PROCEDURAL BACKGROUND

Plaintiff Mildred Grant, pro se filed her initial complaint in the above-captioned matter on September 11, 2012, asserting claims under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act (hereinafter "Title VII"), as amended at 42 U.S.C ยง2000(e), et seq., for race discrimination and hostile work environment. (Doc. 1.) On September 18, 2012, the Court received notice Plaintiff would be represented by counsel rather than proceeding pro se. (Doc. 5.) On February 8, 2013, Defendant answered Plaintiff's complaint. (Doc. 11.)

On February 11, 2014, Defendant moved for Summary Judgment. (Doc. 31.) On March 11, 2014, Defendant by and through counsel, filed her Response in Opposition to Defendant's Motion for Summary Judgment. (Doc. 34.) On March 28, 2014, three days after the Court's deadline, Defendant replied to Plaintiff's Response in Opposition to Defendant's Motion for Summary Judgment. (Doc. 36.) On May 14, 2014, the Parties jointly filed a Motion to Stay All Proceedings pending resolution of Defendant's Motion for Summary Judgment. (Doc. 37.) On May 19, 2014, the Court entered an Order granting the Parties' Motion, staying all proceedings until the Court ruled on Defendant's Motion for Summary Judgment. (Doc. 38.)

DISCUSSION

I. Defendant's Motion for Summary Judgment

A. Summary Judgment Standard

a. Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 56

"Summary judgment is appropriate if the pleadings, depositions, answers to interrogatories, and admissions on file, together with the affidavits, if any, show there is no genuine issue as to any material fact and that the moving party is entitled to judgment as a matter of law." Chow v. Chak Yam Chau, No. 12-15994, 2014 WL 92094, *3 (11th Cir. Jan. 10, 2014) (citing Maddox v. Stephens, 727 F.3d 1109, 1118 (11th Cir. 2013)). "A genuine issue of material fact does not exist unless there is sufficient evidence favoring the nonmoving party for a reasonable jury to return a verdict in its favor." Grimes v. Miami Dade Cnty., 552 F.Appx. 902, 904 (11th Cir. 2014) (citing Chapman v. AI Transp., 229 F.3d 1012, 1023 (11th Cir. 2000)). "An issue of fact is material' if it is a legal element of the claim under the applicable substantive law which might affect the outcome of the case." Allen v. Tyson Foods, Inc., 121 F.3d 642, 646 (11th Cir. 1997) (citing Anderson v. Liberty Lobby, Inc., 477 U.S. 242, 248 (1986)). "It is genuine' if the record taken as a whole could lead a rational trier of fact to find for the nonmoving party." Tipton v. Bergrohr GMBH-Siegen, 965 F.2d 994, 998 (11th Cir. 1992) (citing Matsushita Elec. Indus. Co. v. Zenith Radio Corp., 475 U.S. 574, 587 (1986)).

The movant bears the initial burden of showing, by reference to the record, that there is no genuine issue of material fact. See Celotex Corp. v. Catrett, 477 U.S. 317, 323 (1986); Barreto v. Davie Marketplace, LLC, 331 F.Appx. 672, 673 (11th Cir. 2009). The movant can meet this burden by presenting evidence showing there is no dispute of material fact, or by demonstrating to the district court that the nonmoving party has failed to present evidence in support of some element of its case on which it bears the ultimate burden of proof. See Celotex, 477 U.S. at 322-24. Once the movant has met its burden, the nonmoving party is required "to go beyond the pleadings" and identify "specific facts showing that there is a genuine issue for trial." Id. at 324. To avoid summary judgment, the nonmoving party "must do more than summarily deny the allegations or show that there is some metaphysical doubt as to the material facts.'" Matsuhita, 475 U.S. at 586 (citations omitted). Instead, the nonmovant must point to record evidence that would be admissible at trial. See Jones v. UPS Ground Freight, 683 F.3d 1283, 1294 (11th Cir. 2012) (quoting Macuba v. Deboer, 193 F.3d 1316, 1322 (11th Cir. 1999)) (noting that hearsay may be considered on a motion for summary judgment only if it "could be reduced to admissible evidence at trial or reduced to admissible form"). Such evidence may include affidavits or declarations that are based on personal knowledge of the affiant or declarant. See Fed.R.Civ.P. 56(c)(4).

On a motion for summary judgment, the Court must view all evidence and factual inferences drawn therefrom in the light most favorable to the nonmoving party and determine whether that evidence could reasonably sustain a jury verdict. See Celotex, 477 U.S. at 322-23; Allen, 121 F.3d at 646. However, the Court must grant summary judgment if there is no genuine issue of material fact and the movant is entitled to judgment as a matter of law. Fed.R.Civ.P. 56(c).

b. Local Rule 56

Local Rule 56 requires the ...


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